Due to global health events, area regulations, guidelines and restrictions - our delivery carriers may not meet expected delivery times. Thank you for your patience and understanding.
View Cart (0)
  • Bike Life News

Passenger Friendly: Being an Effective Passenger and Two-Up Rider Tips for those who ride together

Passenger Friendly: Being an Effective Passenger and Two-Up Rider Tips for those who ride together

October 19th 2016

Tips for those who ride together

We encourage every person who's interested in motorcycle riding to give the rider's seat a try. After all, for every fearless rider who took naturally to the handlebars, you’ll find a formerly timid rider amazed to find herself comfortable at the controls. But whether it’s personal preference, physical limitations or another circumstance, it’s perfectly natural for some people to feel more comfortable in the passenger seat—and we applaud you if that's your decision.   

Because so many riders, especially couples who tour, prefer to ride two-up, learning to be a good passenger is a crucial part of riding safely and riding right. Here are some tips that every passenger—and rider with a passenger—should keep in mind when riding two-up.     

Riding two-up is a great way to share the experience of the open road, but it's important to remember that both the rider and passenger play a role in maintaining a safe and fun riding experience.

 

Tips for Being a Good Passenger
  • Be sure the rider is ready for you to get on the bike. Once on, sit still. A shift in your weight can drop the bike, especially at a stop.
  • Once riding, lean with the bike. Looking over the rider's inside shoulder in a curve will nearly always provide the correct angle.
  • If you are to be the navigator, be sure to give directions soon enough that your rider has plenty of time to maneuver.
  • Pay attention to the rider’s physical signals. You can often predict and brace for a quick stop just by feeling the rider's muscles tighten.
  • Communicate. If you need to stop, let the rider know.
  • Take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) beginner course. Better yet, you and your rider should consider taking the course together. Many non-riders say they gained valuable knowledge in the rider course that made them better passengers. 

   
      

Secured by PayPal


Copyright © 2018 TAS Advertising, LLC